Tuning into the heart and mind of the New Testament

An Analysis of New Testament GREEK Words

The TOP 10 most commonly used Greek NOUNS in the New Testament are as follows:

  1. [theos] God (1317 times): Almost always referring to God, not a god;
  2. [Iesous] Jesus (917 times): Almost always referring to Jesus (3 times it refers to Joshua: Luke 3:29; Acts 7:45; Heb 4:8);
  3. [kurios] Lord (717 times): Almost always referring to Jesus or God the Father (and once or so to the Holy Spirit);
  4. [anthropos] Man (550 times): About 82 times it is used in the phrase “Son of Man”, i.e. referring to Jesus. (A few other times β€œman” refers to Jesus). So it refers to anyone other than Jesus a maximum of 468 times;
  5. [Christos] Christ (529 times): Almost always referring to Jesus;
  6. [pater] father, Father (413 times): Approximately 258 times this word is used to refer to God the Father;
  7. [hemera] day, lifetime, time period (389 times);
  8. [pneuma] wind, breath, spirit, Spirit (379 times): About 257 times this refers to the Holy Spirit, or occasionally to God the Father or Jesus;
  9. [huios] son (377 times): About 218 times this is referring to Jesus;
  10. [adelphos] brother (343 times): Approximately 246 times this is referring to believers or followers of Christ.

A Personal Reflection:
The overwhelmingly dominant subject, object, topic, theme and focal point of the New Testament is God: Father, Son & Holy Spirit. As such, it seems that if we really want to be truly Biblical – then, in the midst of every other Biblically valid, wonderful and necessary topics or truths, it is good for our dominant focal point to be true to the spirit, content, passion & “obsession” of the New Testament.

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2 Responses to “Tuning into the heart and mind of the New Testament”

  1. Eden Says:

    Hello! I would love your opinion of my blog πŸ™‚ In Him,

    Like

  2. Eden Says:

    Thank you so much for your kind comment on my blog! Blessings,

    Like

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